I’m not an interior design critic or writer. But show me a beautiful house when I have my camera in-hand and I can play one on the internet.

I wasn’t particularly surprised that P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm home looks like a spread from Traditional Home magazine. After all, he’s firmly rooted in the South, resisting to move his media empire to New York City or Los Angeles. He has that whole Southern elegance thing going on. The house is located on a 650-acre spread overlooking the Arkansas River Valley. And he has developed a certain persona that suggests traditional rather than contemporary.

I was surprised, however, that he opened the doors and let 25 guest bloggers during a recent hosted tour called Garden2Blog 2013  just wander through with their cameras.

P Allen Smith Foyer2

Green apples on a sideboard in the home’s foyer

Smith kindly provided a welcome and introductory remarks that described his historical research into Southern historic houses and the efforts to build Moss Mountain Farm home in the Greek Revival style four years ago. Because of his research into the characteristics of period houses, his house is almost a study in architecture of the time. It is a three-story structure with high ceilings, deep walls, hidden doors and screened porches extending along the back of the house overlooking the Arkansas River Valley.

The interior is a little crowded by contemporary design standards, filled with stuff chairs, arrangements of collections and stacks of book on tables. It’s all very comfortable and pleasing—the kind of place you would enjoy curling up with a good book and a glass of wine.

I certainly hope Smith gets to do that with all his busy-ness. He seems to be forever launching something, making something, promoting something, talking about something, doing, doing, doing.

P. Allen Smith's light-filled kitchen of white-on-white white and marble

P. Allen Smith’s light-filled kitchen of white-on-white white and marble

In addition to his gardening and cooking activities, Smith is also a talented artist. When he went off to study in England his grandmother asked if his plans were to study painting. Smith demurred, saying he planned to study horticulture. “Well, you’re a damned fool,” she replied. (Grandmothers in the South curse in a very charming way, when necessary.)

The house is so photo perfect that some of the bloggers on the tour whispered, “Do you think he really lives here?” Certainly he must, but I caught more than one peaking in kitchen cabinets. I wish I had the nerve to peak inside the refrigerator for signs of habitation—a carton of milk, some leftover chili, a half-eaten carton of vanilla yogurt. I did spot a loaf of store bought bread (gasp) under a cake dome.

P Allen Smith Kitchen collection 3

White-on-white rooms have become cliché in the home decorating magazines. In fact, the editor of Architectural Digest recently commented that the majority of the photos she sees cross her desk are white-on-white. People are so afraid of color!

Nevertheless, my favorite room in the house was the white-on-white, sun-filled kitchen. Kitchens get a pass on my judgment against white-on-white because I think the food should take center stage and not get lost in a sea of color. White also seems more sanitary. If you’ve ever had a white-on-white kitchen, you know why that’s the case. You see every little marinara splash and panko bread crumb. Scrub, scrub, wipe, wipe.

A huge, marble-topped center island fills the center of the kitchen. White ceramic ware arrangements are artfully arranged here and there. There are milky white walls, white appliances and white glass pendant lighting.

An arrangement of egg cups, a ceramic egg tray and wire egg organizer in the white-on-white kitchen at P. Allen Smith's Moss Mountain Farm

Egg cups, a ceramic egg tray and wire egg organizer

What’s an elegant farmhouse without a mud room? Well, you haven’t ever seen a mud room like P. Allen Smith’s mud room. I saw no mud. There was evidence that this is a working area since there were bottles of plant fertilizer, rolls of paper towels and a jumble (an elegant jumble) of flower arranging containers.

P. Allen Smith's Elegant Mudroom

P. Allen Smith’s elegant mudroom

The upstairs screened-in porch is arranged as a sleeping porch, with a deep, hand-forged, open-air copper tub at one end. Smith still seemed a bit uncertain about the decor.

“I hope it doesn’t look like an infirmary.”

The screened-in sleeping porch overlooks the Arkansas River Valley and sleeps three comfortably.

The screened-in sleeping porch overlooks the Arkansas River Valley and sleeps three comfortably.

Upstairs a central foyer is cram packed with a central table and a collection of nature-related treasures. There are only two bedrooms on the second floor of the three-story house–a guest room decorated in greys and mauves and the master bedroom.

The writing desk in P. Allen Smith's master bedroom showcases his love of books

The writing desk in P. Allen Smith’s master bedroom showcases his love of books

 

P. Allen Smith's master bathroom is decorated with an antique mirror collection

P. Allen Smith’s master bathroom is decorated with an antique mirror collection

 

Guest room in mauves and greys at P. Allen Smith's Moss Mountain Farm

Guest room in mauves and greys at P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm

Smith has created a comfortable and lovely home to go with his beautiful gardens. And speaking of gardens, P. Allen Smith’s expansive gardens will be the subject of another post. Soon.

 

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